1. Anonymous User
  2. Exodus
  3. Monday, 26 February 2018
  4.  Subscribe via email
The Lord already used the name Jehovah with Abraham??, so how is this scripture supposed to be interpreted?

Exodus 6:3 And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them.

Is it supposed to be read more like this, "And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, AND by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them?" God was asking a question to Moses.
Rate this post:
Comment
  1. Hal Tomlinson
  2. 1 year ago
  3. #29
When I step back and survey the panoramic view of God’s revelation of Himself through out the many centuries accounted for in the Bible, I see a loving, gentle and patient God letting His children know who He REALLY is. In the commandments given to Moses it said though shalt not kill. Then, Jesus finally reveals what murder actually is when He said “if you hate your brother you are guilty of murder”. This seems to be Gods way. The book of Revelation is not the revelation of John, but the revelation of Jesus Christ. In Exodus 6, God confirms to Moses he had appeared to his predecessors as God Almighty (El Shaddai, the All-Sufficient One). Jehovah (Eternal One who keeps His covenant and fulfills His promises) was a reflection of what God was going to do with Moses which had not been done to date with the former men.
There are no comments made yet.
Rev. David Corbitt
Assistant Pastor
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
0
Votes
Undo
The Lord already used the name Jehovah with Abraham??, so how is this scripture supposed to be interpreted?

Exodus 6:3 And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them.

Is it supposed to be read more like this, "And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, AND by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them?" God was asking a question to Moses.


What a great observation you've made! This has definitely been a "head scratcher" for Bible scholars. How is this verse reconciled with other verses prior to this where the sacred name of YHWH (Yahweh) was employed?

So, first, a little background on the sacred name of God- YHWH. The King James Version (KJV) follows the ancient Jewish practice of substituting the word Adonai (translated LORD- all capitals) whenever the name YHWH was encountered in Scripture. Why did they do this? Because they feared actually speaking the sacred name might accidentally lead to violating the various commandments of not taking God's name in vain. Whenever they were reading Scripture, anytime they encountered the name YHWH, they would actually say "Adonai" (LORD).

Now to get back to your question: back in Genesis, the Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob) called upon God by His revealed name "El-Shaddai"- translated God Almighty, which is known as a compound name of Elohim, the Hebrew word for "God". That does not mean they weren't aware of His sacred name YHWH. Genesis 14 is a good example of this. In this chapter (vs 18-24), Abram meets Melchizedek, the priest of El-Elyon ("God Most High"- another compound name of Elohim). Melchizedek blesses "Abram of El-Elyon". But then Abram, speaking with the king of Sodom, quotes God's sacred name as actually being "YHWH El-Eloyon". Clearly, Abram was aware of YHWH. But, in normal everyday practice, he and Isaac and Jacob called upon God as "El-Shaddai".

In Ex 6:3, God tells Moses that the Patriarchs did not "know" (Hebrew yada) Him by His name YHWH. This Hebrew term yada has essentially two meanings: to "know" by observing or thinking, and to "know" by experiencing. So, while the Patriarchs may have been cognizant of God's sacred name YHWH, they did not "experience" it in the sense of interacting with God through that name. It was primarily by and through El-Shaddai that they interacted and "experienced" a relationship with the one God of the Bible.

Today, we "experience" God- interact with and have a relationship with HIm- primarily through His revealed name Jesus (Hebrew Yeshua). This is actually a compound name of YHWH, specifically, YHWH-Hoshea, meaning "YHWH-Savior". :D
Comment
Bro. David your reply is outstanding! Very informative
There are no comments made yet.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. Exodus
  3. # 1
Rev. David Corbitt
Assistant Pastor
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
0
Votes
Undo
Part Two!

I realized I might need to follow up on my response! The original question had to do with the name Jehovah, and my answer dealt with the name YHWH (spelled out Yahweh). Why the difference?

The original Hebrew texts of the Old Testament didn't use any vowels; they only wrote in consonants. Hence the sacred name God revealed of Himself was written as "YHWH". This came to be known as the Tetragrammaton: literally, the "four consonants". After the Jewish prohibition against writing or speaking the sacred name was adopted sometime in the 3rd -2nd ce B.C., then the Hebrew word Adonai (translated LORD) was substituted.

Over time, there arose a concern that, because only consonants were written, the proper pronunciation of the Hebrew words in Scripture was being lost. During the 6th-10th ce. A.D., a group of Jewish scholars known as the Masoretes began adding vowel points to the texts as they transcribed to aid in pronunciation. Sadly, by this time, the original pronunciation of YHWH was lost. In fact, scholars weren't even sure if the Tetragammaton originally contained two syllables (pronounced Yahweh) or three (pronounced Yehowah). Most modern scholars have settled on the two-syllable Yahweh as the correct one.

During the Protestant Reformation of the 16th ce, an English scholar named William Tyndale translated the Bible into English. He popularized the practice of adding the vowel points of Adonai to the Tetragrammaton. The result was the word IEHOVAH. This now converted the sacred name from a two-syllable word into a three! Later, the I was stylized as J, but with the soft pronunciation of Y. Eventually, the soft sounding "Ya" morphed into the hard "Ja" that we use today, and resulted in the word Jehovah, the J being pronounced like the J in "just" that we're all familiar with.

Where does this all take us? In Exodus 6 of the KJV, where the original Hebrew YHWH was written, we now have the word Jehovah. As Paul Harvey would say, "...and now you know the rest of the story"!
Comment
There are no comments made yet.
  1. more than a month ago
  2. Exodus
  3. # 2
  • Page :
  • 1


There are no replies made for this post yet.
Be one of the first to reply to this post!